Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

Quebec City and the Citadelle of Quebec

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Le Chateau Frontenac

Le Chateau Frontenac


I promised you a bit of Quebec Province. Let’s start with Quebec City because that’s where everyone starts…oui? (Click on any photo to enlarge it and see more detail.) It’s a romantic city, especially when wandered at night while street artists are singing old tunes, the crowd softly singing along, and couples are dancing nearby. Turns out John Denver’s “City of New Orleans” is so much sweeter when sung in French on a warm fall evening.

Dinner and dancing on a warm fall night.

Dinner and dancing on a warm fall night.

In the center of the old city is the LaChateau Frontenac hotel, build in 1892-1893. It’s huge, looks like a castle and it looms over the waterfront of the city.

Overwhelming

Overwhelming

It’s impressive, but I was more drawn to the simple stone and brick family homes.

Someone lives here.

Someone lives here.

They all look so warm and inviting and I like to imagine what it must be like to live there in a property so old, in a culture so unlike my own.

I also like the busy commercial streets full of tourists. The row upon row of shops and restaurants each offering something unique or fun or both intrigue people from all over the world.

Busy with tourists.

Busy with tourists.

At one end of town, high up on a hill is a fort. It’s the Citadelle de Quebec, and of course we walked way up there and took the tour. This is our guide.

He spoke fluent French and very good English and knew everything about the fort.

He spoke fluent French and very good English and knew everything about the fort.

I took this picture because it shows the tour group in his sunglasses. The tour was an hour and a half, and we learned much about the life of the soldiers that lived here, before, during, and after the war of 1812. It’s still an active military base today.

Old and older.

Old and older.

In the above photo you can see the oldest building that survives, built in the 1700s out of field stone, sitting (in this shot) in front of a building made of cut stone built in the 1800s. The older building was the powder magazine, and the outcroppings were there so that if the building exploded the explosion would be absorbed and not injure people in the fort.

Built to protect, even in the 1700s.

Built to protect, even in the 1700s.

From the fort you got a terrific view of the city.

The old city has a boardwalk that runs along the front of it overlooking the water.

The old city has a boardwalk that runs along the front of it overlooking the water.

Also in town are many churches, two of which are called Notre Dame. We found this small older version on our last night as we were heading for the car.

Beautiful.

Beautiful.

It sits in a perfect little square of very old buildings, all lit up at night. That evening, even though we were headed to the car after a very long day having walked over 9 miles and up the equivalent of 80 flights of stairs, (the header photo of this blog is one of the many hills we climbed.) we sat down and just soaked it all in for a bit.

We had already visited the larger version of Notre Dame closer to the center of town.

Statley.

Statley.

This church is beautiful inside in a way that is different than the Notre Dame church we saw in Montreal.

Reverent.

Reverent.

So there’s a little bit about Quebec City. There’s a whole lot more to see and do in the city. We walked a lot the one full day we had in Quebec. But it wasn’t all in the city. Oh no indeed. I have much more to show you, but it’s time for sleep tonight.

You’ll have to wait for Quebec Part II. I think you’ll be surprised.

The blue house.

The blue house.

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Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

11 thoughts on “Quebec City and the Citadelle of Quebec

  1. I love cities that have preserved their history. Thank you for sharing.

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  2. so pretty! we might go there next summer.

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  3. Such pretty architecture
    Snorts,
    Lily & Edward

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  4. All that walking!! Must be great for your legs, Dawn — easy to get 10K steps/day on this trip, huh?! Beautiful photos, and yes, I’m eager to see Part II.

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  5. The hotel is huge like the Greenbrier. We love seeing other places. The city looks so prestine. But it definitely sounds like a buns of steel workout seeing the sights.
    Thanks for being a friend
    Sweet William The Scot

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  6. Thanks for the tour! I’ve been to Quebec City once, maybe 30 years ago, and have only poor-to-fair print photos from that trip. But I loved it! Thanks for bringing that flavor back to my mind.

    Liked by 1 person

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