Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

What’s to miss about running.

19 Comments

Once upon a time a long time ago I use to run.  I was never fast but I got to the finish line.   I used to train for races along with a group of women I’d met online, and then in person at races, and then in person just because they are really cool women.  Then I got busy and I didn’t train as carefully as I should have and I tried to get ready for a half marathon having not run for awhile.  I ran too much too soon and too far and I suffered a hairline fracture in my foot.

The wheelers get ready to start their race.

The wheelers get ready to start their race.

I knew as I was going the longer distances that something was wrong.  I knew the morning of the race as I got up before light and packed the car with all the essentials, warm up clothes, clothes for after, water, food, extra socks, pins, number, that I shouldn’t be running this race.  Still.  I had trained for it.  People were expecting me.  It was an inaugural half marathon through a pretty part of the country.

I wanted to do it.

During the drive to the appointed meeting place I reached over in the dark to the stack of clothing on the other seat.  I didn’t feel my race bib with it’s number, that I KNEW I had put on the top of the pile.  I pulled into an empty parking lot and stopped under a light.  I searched the car.  No bib.  I drove frantically home and searched the house.  No bib.

It was a sign, I decided, that I wasn’t supposed to run this race.  I called my friend and told her I wasn’t coming.  Then I went back to bed.

And I never seriously ran again.  It’s hard to start from scratch.  It takes dedication and time and resolve.  And I can’t seem to get out the door.  It’s been years, the stress fracture is as healed as it’s going to be.  I’ve gone to a foot specialist and purchased custom orthotics.  I could do it.

Anticipation before the race.

Anticipation before the race.

I see runners when I’m driving to and from work, or when we’re on trips.  Portland Maine seemed to be the capital of young athletic fit bodies running half dressed through the streets.  All seem to float effortlessly.  I become enamored again with the concept.

But I don’t float.  I slog and running is not as romantic as I remembered.

 

Here they come!

Here they come!

This weekend I went up to Flint to see the start of the Crim Festival of Races.  Ten thousand plus runners and their supporters were celebrating healthy activity, and the love of running.  I felt the familiar twinge.  No not in my foot; in my heart.  I miss the sense of community running gave me.  I could do that again, I thought to myself.

In order to run you just have to start.

Just start.

Just start.

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Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

19 thoughts on “What’s to miss about running.

  1. Dawn, I ran only a little over a year and I miss it. I was never fast, either, and I never even *loved* it. But it sure is an efficient way to get a good, strong workout. But given my back issues (degenerative disk disease, disk compression, bulging disks, sciatica) I think my chiropractor is right that I shouldn’t keep doing it. 😦 But you could!

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  2. Getting started is the hardest part of anything for me. Good luck with your efforts – it is even harder when you work full time and have other obligations/interests.

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  3. I slog, too, which is why I was always enamored with John “The Penguin” Bingham. I read his book “Marathoning for Mortals,” and get his newsletters, and oh, how I want to run. My body, however, thinks otherwise, and I was reminded today that although I was an athlete for many years, I was never a runner. My body knows how to do back flips and cartwheels and balance on a beam. My new goal, now that I’ve put aside running a 5K, is to do a cartwheel again. I bet I could. If I would just take that first step and get started. I won’t be a gymnast or acrobat again, but I will do a cartwheel, and I will go back to yoga and walking and swimming and biking. Because those are the things my body wants to do. And can do.

    Go ahead. Start. And let us know how it goes. I bet, if you train properly, it will be fab. 🙂

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    • I”m sorry you’ve had to give up running a 5K. Walking it would probably work though. I could never do a cartwheel…not even as a kid. Had no idea how you got your feet to go up in the air like that. Still don’t get how that works.

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  4. Wise words!

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  5. Remember when I was going through a rough time and you helped me? I was looking hopelessly at the mountain — and you helped me focus on the first step. So run to the end of your street and back and put a smile face on your calender on the day. 🙂

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  6. I’ve never run. All my friends do and I know several people who do things like the Iron Man, and marathons all over the world. I’m proud of them. I think slogging is fine and I know starting is the hardest part I guess the real question is do you want too? Or have you hung up your running shoes for the time being.

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    • I have friends still doing Iron Man and marathons too…not so much all over the world, but all over the states…that’s when I get nostalgic…not about the Iron Man, never did that, but the marathons for sure. You have one of the biggest ones, in Chicago, that I never did but always wanted to.

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  7. I was never a runner – never had the lung capacity for it but I loved to walk and walk and walk. Many years ago I set myself a challenge to walk down every street in my town – it took me 18 months and 3 hours of walking every morning – but I did it. Then I came to the USA – the place of no sidewalks, way to much traffic and crazy drivers – where is one to walk – round and round the same park every day just doesn’t seem challenging. I think what I miss most are friendly people, back home when ever you said hi it meant stopping for a quick chat…here when you say hi – people look at you with fear – what do you want, why are you saying hello to me, I don’t know you – good heavens I am 5 foot tall little old women – what is to be scared of ???? So yes – starting again isn’t hard – it is just having the will to do it that is.

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    • It is true, when I”m out at the park running the runners going the other way always say Hi…except for those few really focused serious runners that don’t even see me. Bike people say high to bikers, runners say hi to runners and walkers say hi to both. It’s part of the culture out at the park. I miss that too.

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  8. I took a 30 day online yoga challenge this summer……I’m on day 48 now! WhooHoo! I needed the support of the challenge group to get me started, but now, I can’t imagine a day without some yoga.

    Once you start, it can be tough to stop, especially if it makes you feel good.

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    • I have the support of an online community if I just get out the door. They’re still out there and they’re still very cool women. Congratulations on the yoga challenge!!

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  9. I’ve never been much of a runner. Domer, however, loves it. I guess it’s just what fulfills you deep inside. Personally, I enjoy walking more (and I know walking is good for you). I can take Dallas with me, we can visit with other people and dogs, we can take photos. Running, especially when it’s 90 degrees out with 90% humidity, just doesn’t sound like FUN!

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    • I don’t know that I ever loved the running itself. Once in awhile it went well, most of the time it was a huge struggle. I think it’s mostly the community I miss. And the feeling of accomplishment.

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  10. I read this on my phone the other day where I don’t even try to fiddle with WP. I really, really liked this post. I think that even non-runners can relate to the pull you feel. Reading through the comments, it sounds like you really need a good fitness community. My mom joined a gym in the last year, and the community she’s found there has been terrific. There’s a class she goes to twice a week that has lots of like-minded women, and she’s made some lasting friendships as well as fitness goals.

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