Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

Lighthouse day

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Maine has fifty-seven active lighthouses; we only saw five yesterday and it took us all day! But what a fun day it was.  First up is the Rockland Breakwater light.  It’s at the end of a breakwater, built in 1888 and  7/8 of a mile long.  The lighthouse was built in 1902.

Do you see the lighthouse way out there?

Do you see the lighthouse way out there?

You walk along huge flat granite rocks, watching where you put your feet because there are large cracks and holes between the rocks.  It’s something of a giant jigsaw puzzle and it takes longer than you expect to get out to the lighthouse.

Welcoming ships to the harbor.

Welcoming ships to the harbor.

It was a good way to start the morning, that long walk in the sea breezes.

Next was Owls Head Light Station.  It’s located at the mouth of the Rockland harbor and was built in 1825.

The Coast Guard maintains many of the lighthouses.

The Coast Guard maintains many of the lighthouses.

The light itself sits on a rock bluff over what many people saw as the face of an owl etched by mother nature in the rock below.  I looked hard at photos but I couldn’t see the owl.

The story is that Spot, the family dog of one of the keepers kept many ships off the rocks with his ceaseless barking.  Katie would be an excellent lighthouse dog!

The view is worth the climb.

The view is worth the climb.

While we were at Owls Light we saw a brochure for Marshall Point Light, not to far away.  So of course we headed right over.  Turns out not to far away is further than you think as you ‘can’t get there from here’ and everything is up and around another bay.

There's a museum here, and a memorial to lost commercial fishermen.

There’s a museum here, and a memorial to lost commercial fishermen.

But this is a beautiful lighthouse, built in 1858 near Port Clyde, a beautiful fishing village, the 30 foot light tower is out on the rocky point, accessible by a wooden bridge.

Flags flying high.

Flags flying high.

We moved on to our favorite lighthouse of the day; Pemaquid Point Light.  Don’t you wonder how names come about?    This lighthouse was built in 1827 on a beautiful rocky point.

The light warns ships of the rocks.

The light warns ships of the rocks.

The rocks look like liquid stone, with iron ore running through the dark base.  It’s simply amazing.  Exploring the rocks is almost as much fun as exploring the lighthouse.

Going up?

Going up?

This lighthouse also allows visitors up inside the tower.  It’s quite tight up there, but it was worth the short wait to climb the stairs and look out over the ocean.

 

Beautiful sea views.

Beautiful sea views.

We spent a long time at this lighthouse.  We could have sat on the rocks and watched the waves crash all day.

To break the lighthouse spell, and add some variety to our day we stopped at Fort William Henry, a restoration and a Pemaqid State Historic site on Pemaquid Beach.

Rebuilt tower houses small museum.

Rebuilt tower houses small museum.

Here we had a tour guide talk about some of the artifacts found at the site.  They are still excavating here each summer.

Explaining some of the past.

Explaining some of the past.

I think she was bored before we arrived and started asking all sorts of questions.  She really enjoyed telling us about the site and the work that was being done there.

Waiting for someone to ask.

Waiting for someone to ask.

Our last stop of the day was Hendricks Head Light.  We drove a long time to find this one, and in the end the closest we could get was a public beach.

Secluded beauty.

Secluded beauty.

Still, it was beautiful and I’m glad we found it.

I hope you enjoyed our tour of a few of Maine’s lighthouses.  We certainly did.  Today we’re going to take it easy, after all, it is a vacation!

We’ll talk later.

Waiting to be discovered.

Waiting to be discovered.

 

 

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Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

12 thoughts on “Lighthouse day

  1. I loved your tour of some of the lighthouses!!! Thanks!

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  2. Finding lighthouses in Maine really is like solving a puzzle! Fun times!

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  3. I love lighthouses — what a fantastic trip you’re having!!

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  4. I wonder what it is about light houses that we all love so much, the isolation, quiet, being near the sea….standing there strong against the storms…..sigh – I love lighthouses 🙂 There is one just outside Sydney that is totally awesome.

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  5. Fantastic! Thanks for sharing with us Dawn.

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  6. This looks amazing! I really want to go to Maine, too.

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